Research

Instructor experiences with a social networking site in a higher education setting: Expectations, frustrations, appropriation, and compartmentalization

University of Idaho
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Researchers and practitioners have suggested that the use of social networking sites in formal education may be a worthwhile endeavor. Toward this goal, emerging learning platforms have included social networking features. Nevertheless, empirical literature examining user experiences, and more specifically instructor experiences, with these tools is limited. In this qualitative study, we address this gap in the literature by reporting the experiences of five instructors who used a social networking platform in their courses. We find that instructors (a) had expectations of Elgg that stemmed from numerous sources, (b) used Elgg in heterogeneous ways and for varied purposes, (c) compartmentalized Elgg and used it in familiar ways, and (d) faced frustrations stemming from numerous sources. We note that the ways Elgg came to be used “on the ground” is contested and contrasts starkly with the narrative of how social software might contribute benefits to educational practice. In addition, we note that learning management systems may frame the ways through which other tools, such as social media and Elgg, are understood, used, and experienced.

Veletsianos, G., Kimmons, R., and French, K. (2013). Instructor experiences with a social networking site in a higher education setting: Expectations, frustrations, appropriation, and compartmentalization. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(2), 255-278.

Publications

  1. Kimmons, R., & Hall, C. (2016). Toward a broader understanding of teacher technology integration beliefs and values. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 24(3), 309-335.
  2. Kimmons, R., & Hall, C. (2016).  Emerging technology integration models. In G. Veletsianos (Ed.), Emergence and Innovation in digital learning: foundations and applications. Edmonton, AB. Athabasca University Press.
  3. Kimmons, R. (accepted). Expansive openness in teacher practice. Teachers College Record, 119(1).
  4. Hall, C. & Raidl, M. (2015).

Conference Presentations

  1. Hall, C., & Hamilton, M. (2017). Validating technology integration through the Danielson Framework. Presented at ICETI (International Conference on Engineering Technology and Innovation) for iSTEM, Orlando, FL. 
  2. Weesner, J., & Hall, C. (2017). Applying google classroom. Presented at NCCE (Northwest Council for Computer Education, Portland, OR.
  3. Hall, C. (2017). Distance connections with K-12 schools: Potential for impacting go-on and retention rates in Idaho.

Chromebook Initiative Instructions for Schools

University of Idaho
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The Idaho Chromebook Initiative is a research project directed by the University of Idaho Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning. In this project, participating schools are provided with a set of Chromebooks for teachers and a classroom set of Chromebooks for student use. This study has two goals: 1) to provide schools with technology resources that will be valuable to them and 2) to gather data on usage and student outcomes. In this process, the second goal requires certain guidelines of implementation and data collection processes from participating schools.

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